Ali Vural Ak Center for Global Islamic Studies
College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Center Lecture Series

The Center for Global Islamic Studies regularly hosts lectures by established and emerging scholars who bring diverse perspectives to the discussions of global Islam. They contribute to the intellectual life of the center, George Mason University, and the local community. View all of the center's recorded lectures here and on Vimeo.

Spring 2017 Events

Feb. 1, 6:00pm, Merten Hall Room 1204

Panel Discussion: "Xenophobia and Islamophobia in the Modern Era"

In recent years, the United States has witnessed an increase in xenophobic and Islamophobic rhetoric. The prevalence of inaccurate information about immigrants and Muslims has resulted in significant fear and mistrust in many communities. This panel discussion will present facts about these two specific groups in order to promote greater understanding and empower audience members to engage in informed activism. Speakers include Amber Jamil (American Pakistan Foundation), Ahmet Tekelioglu (Center for Global Islamic Studies), Besheer Mohamed (Pew Research Center), and Patricia Maulden (School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution).

Feb. 7, 4:00pm, Fenwick Library Main Reading Room

Town Hall Discussion: "Perspectives on the Immigration Ban"

Distinguished GMU faculty members discuss the impact of the recent immigration ban and its surrounding issues. Speakers include Bassam Haddad (Schar School of Policy and Government), Noura Erakat (School of Integrative Studies), Peter Mandaville (Schar School of Policy of Government), Ahmet Tekelioglu (Center for Global Islamic Studies), Huseyin Yilmaz (Department of History), and Sumaiya Hamdani (Department of History). Click here to read a full summary

Mar. 7, 4:30pm, Research Hall Room 163

"The Ambivalence of Islam in U.S. Foreign Policy" with Peter Mandaville

Reflecting on his three years working at the State Department during the Obama administration, Mandaville discusses the complex and at times contradictory approaches to Islam and Muslims that characterized U.S. foreign policy in the context of the 2009 Cairo speech, the Arab Uprisings and their aftermath, as well as efforts to address the rise of ISIS. He also assesses how the Trump administration is likely to approach these same issues.

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